How To Repair A Kitchen Faucet Aerator

Ever noticed your faucet spitting and spraying in all directions? Well, you likely have a clogged aerator. An aerator is a mesh screen that covers the end of the faucet. It constricts the flow slightly, increasing the water pressure and reducing water usage.

But, if your water has a lot of minerals in it, over time your aerator may become clogged and need to be replaced. You are certainly welcome to call My Plumber, and we would be happy to replace it for you. But it is one of those little household maintenance tasks that you can learn to deal with yourself if you like.

  1. Turn off the water going to the sink. Shut-off valves should be located under the sink. If you can’t find any valves under the sink or they do not work you will have to turn off the main water valve. This isn’t *strictly* necessary, but it is a good safety practice, because sometimes faucets will become so corroded that when you try to remove the aerator, the end breaks off. It doesn’t happen often, but it does happen, and it’s better safe than sorry.

  2. Open the faucet to alleviate pressure and to make sure the water supply is shut off.

  3. Next you will want to cover the drain holes with a rag to keep from losing small parts.

  4. Use your hand to twist the very end of the faucet, right where the water comes out. It’s basically like a mason jar lid that holds the aerator in place. Most are simply hand tight and you should be able to loosen it right off.

  5. If that doesn’t work, take a tip from the mason jar analogy and try twisting with a rag or a grippy jar opener. If it still doesn’t move, use a pair of wide pliers wrapped in a rag to prevent scratching the finish.

  6. When you get it apart, you have the choice of cleaning it. Inspect the interior of the valve for mineral deposits. Vinegar can help clear away mineral deposits. Otherwise, take it down to your hardware store and grab a replacement.

  7. Clean the faucet body out with a screwdriver. It doesn’t do much good to get a clean aerator if it’s just going to get re-clogged in a week.

  8. Flush out any remaining debris by turning the water supply valve on slightly.

  9. Pop in the new aerator, reassemble the faucet and slowly turn the valve back on to let the water run freely.

  10. Congratulations! You just replaced your faucet aerator.

But, if you’re sick of your spitting faucet, call My Plumber today at 866-779-7204. They will be able to help you get your sink back up and running in no time.